Posts Tagged‘Reading Recovery’

Short Intervention, Long Term Impact

Reading Recovery has life long impact on students

In 1999, Jack, a student in Yukon, was at the lowest reading level in his class in Grade 1. His parents were shocked to receive this news, but when offered the opportunity to have him participate in Reading Recovery, they  gratefully accepted this offer of support.

Jack, Impact of Reading Recovery

Jack when he was a Reading Recovery Student

Following just a few weeks of the Reading Recovery literacy intervention in his school, Jack’s reading level improved dramatically. He finished his Grade 2 year at the highest reading level in his class.
Jack’s teachers referred to him as the “perfect Reading Recovery student”.  He was able to accelerate
his learning and quickly catch up to his peers.

Jack enjoyed his time in Reading Recovery so much that he turned up at the Reading Recovery
room at the beginning of Grade 3 ready to continue his work with Ms. Marie!

The short term intervention of Reading Recovery has made a difference for Jack.  Throughout elementary school and high school, Jack was an avid reader and an above average student. In 2011 Jack graduated from high school with honours.   Currently, Jack is finishing his Bachelor of Arts undergraduate degree at UVic and achieving A’s in his program.  He is also an excellent writer and a voracious reader of global politics, biographies, and fiction anchored in history and travel adventures.

Jack has come a long way since his beginnings as the lowest achieving reader in his Grade 1 class!  Without the Reading Recovery intervention it is possible Jack would struggle with reading, writing and academic achievement throughout his education and into adulthood.  The short time he spent with Ms. Marie in Reading Recovery has made all the difference for Jack.

Parents of children who are struggling to read and write often wonder what they can do to help their children be better readers and writer.  There are many things parents can do which can help young children with reading – read to them, give them books to read, point out letters and words you see in public, let them see you reading, take them to the library.

Even with these activities some children will struggle to learn to read once they get into school.  For these children Reading Recovery is an effective way, in a short amount of time to bring the kids who are struggling the most up to a level equal to the other readers in their grade.  Not all schools have Reading Recovery though, so one of the ways parents can help is to advocate for the school board, division or district to implement Reading Recovery.  Reading Recovery makes a life long impact!

 

Implementing Reading Recovery in Manitoba First Nations

In 2014, the first Reading Recovery Training Centre in a First Nations community opened in Manitoba.  The opening was cause for celebration.

Reading Recovery in First Nations

Gloria Sinclair, Reading Recovery Teacher Leader for Manitoba First Nations Education & Resource Centre.

Gloria Sinclair was selected as the first Teacher Leader to guide the implementation of Reading Recovery.  The winter issue of The Journal of Reading Recovery, features an article written by, Gloria Sinclair, Allyson Matczuk and Irene Huggins.  The article that reflects on the implementation of Reading Recovery by the Manitoba First Nations Education Resource Centre.  Outlined are the details of how Reading Recovery has been implemented in an area that this made up of many small, rural and very remote communities.

Read about the achievements of Ray, a student who could recognize only 7 letters and with only 12 lessons he read little books, wrote in full sentences and confidently answered questions about what he was doing!

The implementation has been so successful that a second Teacher Leader has been trained and another Reading Recovery Training Centre has just opened in Thompson, Manitoba.

Learn more by reading the full article.

School District 27 celebrates 20 years of Reading Recovery

School District #27 in BC Celebrates 20 Years of Reading Recovery

School District No. 27 was recognized for 20 years of Reading Recovery intervention success by the Canadian Institute of Reading Recovery.  This early reading intervention has directly supported over 1700 Grade 1 students to overcome reading difficulties.  There have been more than 80 teachers trained in Reading Recovery and those 80 teachers have gone on to impact over 15,000 students in School District No. 27 through changes in teaching methods over the past 20 years.

The June 20, 2017 evening celebration, hosted by the current Reading Recovery Teacher Leader, Lori

23 Reading Recovery Teachers

23 Reading Recovery Teachers in District #27

Kelly, included a short program of special guests who spoke about their role in the inception and development of Reading Recovery in School District No. 27 over the past 20 years.  Special guests included teacher Delores Goerz and school psychologist Darryl Grams who initially brought the program to the district, past Reading Recovery Teacher Leader Lorraine Smith, and Brian Butcher who was the superintendent of schools at Reading Recovery’s introduction to the District.

There were several past students who are now adults and families who came out

20 Years of Reading Recovery

Christine and Tanya – 20 Years of Reading Recovery Certificate

with their children who were a part of Reading Recovery.  Thanks to funds from the Williams Lake Truckers Association each child who attended was able to choose a book to take home.

School District No. 27 produced a short video describing the impact of Reading Recovery over these past 20 years which was well received by the crowd of approximately 75 people.  The evening culminated with The Reading Recovery Trainer for the Mountain Pacific Region, Christine Fraser, presenting Tanya Gunther, SD 27 Board of Education chair, with a certificate of recognition on behalf of the Canadian Institute of Reading Recovery. Christine commended the District on its accomplishments over the past 20 years and said she would like to bottle up all the positive energy in the room and take it with her around the region to other school districts.